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Tagged ‘Fast Company‘

Social Media Strangers

There have been a few revelations on the internet regarding social connections. Facebook is still a roaring success of keeping in touch with user-selected friends and family, Twitter allows quick, rapid conversations within  140 characters. Two of the latest sites that are creating some buzz are ChatRoulette and Mystery Seeker. Both sites feed off randomness but in different extremes.

ChatRoulette

One of the latest video fads, large enough to be featured in Fast Company (here), pairs you up with random strangers via video or  text-only conversations. What originated from the mind of a 17-year old Russian kid, has quickly turned to a exhibitionists dream. Picture having a conversation about comic books with a fat guy wearing a bear costume, or a discussion of Latin in the 21st century with a dominatrix and her hand puppet… The opportunities are endless. It’s kind of cool to interact with others you wouldn’t normally think to, but as with most web platforms, it hasn’t taken long for there to be large amounts of sexual content. BEWARE!

Mystery Seeker (formerly Mystery Google)

The foundation of this site is based around the search engine Google, with the spin of receiving search results from the previous user. Naturally, I had to try it out. I looked up “Cat food” and received actual Google Search results for “Strep Throat”. Meh, the novelty has now worn off. It’s a kitchy, gimmick site that isn’t going to get any traction. So why is it still a hot topic online? Is it an opportunity to expand knowledge on topic you haven’t thought of? Or is it just an opportunity for voyeurism? I bet you will try this one out at least once.

Are these “random” sites the next progression of social interaction? Or is it just a quick zig when others zag experiment? What are your thoughts??

Ethonomics

The latest buzzword. Wikipedia’s definition: the study of ethics in the marketplace. For years now, companies have been working hard to “Go Green” (it’s almost business suicide not to). What started out as company one-upper, has quickly become an expectation from consumable-conscious consumers. Purchase decisions are no longer just based on price comparison, or calorie intake numbers. The newest differentiator is how much wastage is saved through product creation, packaging and distribution. Not only does it benefit the companies bottom line, but it is also great for market positioning.

The numbers are staggering when auditing behemoth companies*:

  • General Mills has reduced yogurt packaging enough to save 1,200 tons of plastic annually.
  • Unilever has reduced water consumption by 63%, and CO2 emissions by 39%.
  • Frito-Lay have one-third of their factories at “zero landfill” status.

Small tweaks on their end make significant differences. Sure, they are saving the planet (as much as possible), but they are also attracting green consumers willing to buy efficient products. It’s a win-win. Now that’s good business.

While you might not have the distribution levels as Coke, Walmart, or Unilever, every bit helps. Our own office consumables have been dramatically reduced to do our part. What changes in your company can be made?

* sourced via fastcompany.com